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Antony Addington

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design 2019 / 20

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Estelle Akeroyd-Hunt

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design 2019 / 20

Categories
Painting
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Lucas Allan

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design 2019 / 20

'Good Posture' Oil on canvas.

“When thought is expressed in an artistic image, an exact form has been found for it, attempting to convey a creators ideal.”  - Andrei Tarkovsky.

I have found that this is most purely expressed in cinema, a form that allows for an utterly direct, emotional and intense perception of a second reality. Each frame or scene is not just a description, but a fragment of an action, or landscape, or face. A temporal image that sets up a resistance to the viewer. Throughout this project I have been attempting to extrapolate this very notion. In painting there is a physical distance between the picture and the viewer, a distance that creates a certain reverence towards what it depicts. I wanted to explore this moment, using a personal selection of photocopied film stills, I then distilled the imagery to a bare moment of a pause, almost like holding your breath. These paintings are my films.

'Good Posture' Study. Oil on canvas.

'Untitled' Oil on canvas.

'Framed Sapling' Oil and varnish on canvas.

'Untitled' Oil on canvas.

'Run Into A Friend, Walk Into A Stranger' Watercolour and Inkjet on paper.

'Good Posture' Oil on canvas.

“When thought is expressed in an artistic image, an exact form has been found for it, attempting to convey a creators ideal.”  - Andrei Tarkovsky.

I have found that this is most purely expressed in cinema, a form that allows for an utterly direct, emotional and intense perception of a second reality. Each frame or scene is not just a description, but a fragment of an action, or landscape, or face. A temporal image that sets up a resistance to the viewer. Throughout this project I have been attempting to extrapolate this very notion. In painting there is a physical distance between the picture and the viewer, a distance that creates a certain reverence towards what it depicts. I wanted to explore this moment, using a personal selection of photocopied film stills, I then distilled the imagery to a bare moment of a pause, almost like holding your breath. These paintings are my films.

'Good Posture' Study. Oil on canvas.

'Untitled' Oil on canvas.

'Framed Sapling' Oil and varnish on canvas.

'Untitled' Oil on canvas.

'Run Into A Friend, Walk Into A Stranger' Watercolour and Inkjet on paper.

Categories
Painting
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Rafe Arthur

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design 2019 / 20

‘Forbidden Love’ Arcylic, oil and ink on canvas

My project ‘Life Through the Brush’ has been an autobiographical exploration, exercised through my own artistic process. I have both consciously and unconsciously delved into my deepest selves, drawing on emotional and prolific times in my life - using my experience of life and life within relationships. The work has given me more of an insight to who I am, and what it means for me, to be myself within society, hopefully allowing others to do the same.

I explore the relationships with the men and women of my life. And as a gay man how these people have both harmed me and held me, in many manifestations. Drawing on these deeply personal experiences and reflections - as well as my first-person narrative - I express an upmost sense of honesty hopefully allowing an instant connection between myself and the viewer, therefore my work and the viewer.

‘The Blood was on My Hands’ Acrylic and oil on canvas

Working with a practical process which allows my unconscious thoughts and feelings to streamline through the brush, quickly and instantaneously, I allow the project title, ‘Life Through the Brush’, to be unified and congruent to the works I have created. I hope the works develop their own reality within the world, as ones’ own reality is present within life, all equally individual for ourselves. We share our lives and experiences with others and I think it important for me to reflect on these moments to understand and resolve myself within society, whilst resolving the work itself.

‘The Absence of You’ Acrylic, ink and oil on canvas

I aim to continue my practice, discovering more about myself and the world, through my work. My artistic journey is young and I hope my work and my practice will continue to mature together with my own self, alongside that of the evolution of society within the world of which we live; continuing my practice till death.

‘Love’ Oil on cartridge

‘For us together’ Oil on cartridge

Links

Website

‘Forbidden Love’ Arcylic, oil and ink on canvas

My project ‘Life Through the Brush’ has been an autobiographical exploration, exercised through my own artistic process. I have both consciously and unconsciously delved into my deepest selves, drawing on emotional and prolific times in my life - using my experience of life and life within relationships. The work has given me more of an insight to who I am, and what it means for me, to be myself within society, hopefully allowing others to do the same.

I explore the relationships with the men and women of my life. And as a gay man how these people have both harmed me and held me, in many manifestations. Drawing on these deeply personal experiences and reflections - as well as my first-person narrative - I express an upmost sense of honesty hopefully allowing an instant connection between myself and the viewer, therefore my work and the viewer.

‘The Blood was on My Hands’ Acrylic and oil on canvas

Working with a practical process which allows my unconscious thoughts and feelings to streamline through the brush, quickly and instantaneously, I allow the project title, ‘Life Through the Brush’, to be unified and congruent to the works I have created. I hope the works develop their own reality within the world, as ones’ own reality is present within life, all equally individual for ourselves. We share our lives and experiences with others and I think it important for me to reflect on these moments to understand and resolve myself within society, whilst resolving the work itself.

‘The Absence of You’ Acrylic, ink and oil on canvas

I aim to continue my practice, discovering more about myself and the world, through my work. My artistic journey is young and I hope my work and my practice will continue to mature together with my own self, alongside that of the evolution of society within the world of which we live; continuing my practice till death.

‘Love’ Oil on cartridge

‘For us together’ Oil on cartridge

Links

Website

Categories
Painting
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Isabella Atkinson-Bradbury

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design 2019 / 20

'Body Horror' (short film): Developed from multiple digitally edited photography/film photography trials by experimenting with video media, editing and audio (and is still a work in progress). This short film explores discomforting imagery through video collage, expressing abstracted and distorted body forms and creating a dream-like surrealist atmosphere. The audio explores bodily sounds, along with distorted voices. This is to convey bodily repulsiveness, causing the video to become frantic and restless. Inspiration from Pipilotti Rist's video art, Mark Leckey's use of video collage (as seen recently at Tate Britain) and David Lynch's films such as 'Eraserhead’.

Black and white photography from ‘Shoot 2’, edited using photoshop to digitally modify images, experimenting with the process of overlaying and distorting imagery - achieved by adding gelatine (made from animal body parts) onto the figure conveying abstracted, surrealistic figurative forms. Inspiration from David lynch’s work, particularly the body horror film ‘Eraserhead’ and Hitchcock’s ‘Psycho’.

Photography with gelatine and jelly

‘Distortion- LIQUIFY’ images created in Adobe Photoshop. Digital Photography

The two most influential artists for me with this project have been Pipilotti Rist and David Lynch. I have used Rist’s compositions, colour pallets and distorted perspective photographically and in my cinematography. Lynch’s experimental body horror black and white film heavily influenced me in the visual language I adopted for this project, creating abstracted body forms by using organic or manufactured material (which later became jellies, fruits and latex).

‘Distortion- LIQUIFY’ images created in Adobe Photoshop. Digital Photography

There have been many limitations on what I could produce during COVID-19 isolation. I had already completed two shoots (using digital cameras, video cameras and 35mm film photography) and one with fruit (completed in quarantine), but I had planned and organised to do a fourth and final shoot with two bodies rather than just one, which was no longer possible. I aimed to create more abstraction in my photography by intertwining the forms of the female nude to distort recognisable structure, so to still achieve this effect I decided to overlay my images to create the effect of more than one body. This ended up being more successful than I’d originally anticipated and I continued to develop this throughout my project.

‘Distortion- LIQUIFY’ images created in Adobe Photoshop. Digital Photography

The fine balance between people finding beauty in or being disgusted by my images created a shift in focus for me. I began to play with colours more when I was editing my videos and layered photography, experimenting with saturation, hue and luminosity levels. I had been focusing on using different mixes of jellies and gelatine to achieve wet, fleshy forms to put onto the body, but I started to use more organic materials such as blood oranges to give beauty with colour to the ‘flesh’ compositions I was creating.

It's been challenging learning new digitalskills to create what I had envisioned in my head. I have acquired a more open-minded approach to my projects and confidenceto be more adventurous in their concepts and content. I plan to continue learning and creating digital art, taking this forward in the future on my art BA.

'Body Horror' (short film): Developed from multiple digitally edited photography/film photography trials by experimenting with video media, editing and audio (and is still a work in progress). This short film explores discomforting imagery through video collage, expressing abstracted and distorted body forms and creating a dream-like surrealist atmosphere. The audio explores bodily sounds, along with distorted voices. This is to convey bodily repulsiveness, causing the video to become frantic and restless. Inspiration from Pipilotti Rist's video art, Mark Leckey's use of video collage (as seen recently at Tate Britain) and David Lynch's films such as 'Eraserhead’.

Black and white photography from ‘Shoot 2’, edited using photoshop to digitally modify images, experimenting with the process of overlaying and distorting imagery - achieved by adding gelatine (made from animal body parts) onto the figure conveying abstracted, surrealistic figurative forms. Inspiration from David lynch’s work, particularly the body horror film ‘Eraserhead’ and Hitchcock’s ‘Psycho’.

Photography with gelatine and jelly

‘Distortion- LIQUIFY’ images created in Adobe Photoshop. Digital Photography

The two most influential artists for me with this project have been Pipilotti Rist and David Lynch. I have used Rist’s compositions, colour pallets and distorted perspective photographically and in my cinematography. Lynch’s experimental body horror black and white film heavily influenced me in the visual language I adopted for this project, creating abstracted body forms by using organic or manufactured material (which later became jellies, fruits and latex).

‘Distortion- LIQUIFY’ images created in Adobe Photoshop. Digital Photography

There have been many limitations on what I could produce during COVID-19 isolation. I had already completed two shoots (using digital cameras, video cameras and 35mm film photography) and one with fruit (completed in quarantine), but I had planned and organised to do a fourth and final shoot with two bodies rather than just one, which was no longer possible. I aimed to create more abstraction in my photography by intertwining the forms of the female nude to distort recognisable structure, so to still achieve this effect I decided to overlay my images to create the effect of more than one body. This ended up being more successful than I’d originally anticipated and I continued to develop this throughout my project.

‘Distortion- LIQUIFY’ images created in Adobe Photoshop. Digital Photography

The fine balance between people finding beauty in or being disgusted by my images created a shift in focus for me. I began to play with colours more when I was editing my videos and layered photography, experimenting with saturation, hue and luminosity levels. I had been focusing on using different mixes of jellies and gelatine to achieve wet, fleshy forms to put onto the body, but I started to use more organic materials such as blood oranges to give beauty with colour to the ‘flesh’ compositions I was creating.

It's been challenging learning new digitalskills to create what I had envisioned in my head. I have acquired a more open-minded approach to my projects and confidenceto be more adventurous in their concepts and content. I plan to continue learning and creating digital art, taking this forward in the future on my art BA.

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Nina Attwood

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design 2019 / 20

Mono print and ghost print on paper

Graphite on paper

In my work I am interested in colour and form; I use mono printing as a preliminary stage of exploring these elements and to work through and inspire future paintings. The printing process allows me to work quickly as I am able to wipe away and alter the oil paints easily on the metal plate. I have found this has opened up a new way of painting for me which is much more fluid and organic. My figurative work has a unified sense to it, my figures recede into the background and this creates an unsettling flat perspective. I am often inspired by found photographs, particularly photo journalism, because by completely detaching an image from its story, a disjointed and surreal scene can be invented.

Mono print on paper

Watercolour on paper

Mono print on paper

Acrylic on Paper

Acrylic on Paper

Image transfer and acrylic on canvas

Acrylic on Paper

Zinc etching on paper

Mono print and ghost print on paper

Graphite on paper

In my work I am interested in colour and form; I use mono printing as a preliminary stage of exploring these elements and to work through and inspire future paintings. The printing process allows me to work quickly as I am able to wipe away and alter the oil paints easily on the metal plate. I have found this has opened up a new way of painting for me which is much more fluid and organic. My figurative work has a unified sense to it, my figures recede into the background and this creates an unsettling flat perspective. I am often inspired by found photographs, particularly photo journalism, because by completely detaching an image from its story, a disjointed and surreal scene can be invented.

Mono print on paper

Watercolour on paper

Mono print on paper

Acrylic on Paper

Acrylic on Paper

Image transfer and acrylic on canvas

Acrylic on Paper

Zinc etching on paper

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Mariam Aziz

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design 2019 / 20

My time at City & Guilds of London Art School has taught me so much about the history of contemporary art, and how my practice relates to a lineage of female artists making artworks that touch the domestic sphere. I have been able to explore a range of mediums from ceramics to zine making, and I feel like the possibilities for my practice have expanded whilst studying here. My favourite artist that I discovered whilst studying here is Annette Messenger, she inspired me to use domestic objects in my own work which over the year has taken shape in textiles, sculpture and filmmaking. I am especially interested in how household items operate as a means of sensory production. I’m also inspired by Dadaism in the way that common objects can be repurposed to express political and social feelings.

Thematically, my work focuses on how modern art relates to disability and how the perceptions of disabled individuals can contribute to making interesting and innovative artwork. One example is my film ‘Please Give Me 30 Seconds to Respond’ which I made for the final major project. In my film I wanted to educate people about the wide range of responses Autistic people can feel when engaging with commonplace objects in the household such as a kitchen whisk and meat tenderiser. I also designed and made my own sculptures such as a bath sponge embedded with marbles. I tried to be open-minded about how I could provoke a sensory response, using everything from CDs that create rainbow effects to filming Playdoh as an object that can easily be changed into different forms. One of my biggest challenges on the course was developing the film’s soundtrack, something I had never done before. I recorded everyday noises and distorted the distressing sounds to show how an Autistic person might hear upon leaving their home.

My time at City & Guilds of London Art School has taught me so much about the history of contemporary art, and how my practice relates to a lineage of female artists making artworks that touch the domestic sphere. I have been able to explore a range of mediums from ceramics to zine making, and I feel like the possibilities for my practice have expanded whilst studying here. My favourite artist that I discovered whilst studying here is Annette Messenger, she inspired me to use domestic objects in my own work which over the year has taken shape in textiles, sculpture and filmmaking. I am especially interested in how household items operate as a means of sensory production. I’m also inspired by Dadaism in the way that common objects can be repurposed to express political and social feelings.

Thematically, my work focuses on how modern art relates to disability and how the perceptions of disabled individuals can contribute to making interesting and innovative artwork. One example is my film ‘Please Give Me 30 Seconds to Respond’ which I made for the final major project. In my film I wanted to educate people about the wide range of responses Autistic people can feel when engaging with commonplace objects in the household such as a kitchen whisk and meat tenderiser. I also designed and made my own sculptures such as a bath sponge embedded with marbles. I tried to be open-minded about how I could provoke a sensory response, using everything from CDs that create rainbow effects to filming Playdoh as an object that can easily be changed into different forms. One of my biggest challenges on the course was developing the film’s soundtrack, something I had never done before. I recorded everyday noises and distorted the distressing sounds to show how an Autistic person might hear upon leaving their home.

X

Charlotte Bagshaw

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design 2019 / 20

Water colour and acrylic on paper

Picasso’s concrete and metal sculptures made in collaboration with Carl Nesjar and Lionel Prejger, kick-started the beginning of my project. Looking at the simplistic cut out shapes of Picasso’s paper models, which his collaborators then transformed, showed me the potential in paper as a medium for my work and how I could develop from it. Having previously researched and engaged largely in set design and architecture, these sculptures showed me a way I could translate these interests.

Water colour and acrylic on paper

Charcoal and chalk on paper

My original plan from the paper sculptures I made was to move into more solid materials, but being in lockdown I could not carry this it out at home. This pushed my work into painting and photography, finding that my paper sculptures could not stand on their own as finished pieces of work.

Looking at artists such as Bob Thompson and the Futurism movement, experimenting with colour has become an important feature. Developing this has been the most successful outcome in my work.

Sculpture is still a key part to this project; even with the work I’m largely producing being two-dimensional; it is a very important influence. Looking at the prints and drawings Naum Gabo made of his sculptures, I have strived to keep that same sculptural quality in my paintings. I see my art developing further with film and a more minimalist abstract style with my most recent interest being in the early works of Agnes Martin and her more subdued palette, along with the Taos Modernists.

Charcoal and chalk on paper

Acrylic on paper

In the next stage of my education looking into different materials and making sculpture will be important. But this time has allowed me to investigate the incorporation of both painting and sculpture together. This has been valuable and introduced me to range of art movements and artists that have greatly impacted my view on both art forms.

Acrylic on paper

Charcoal and colour pencil on paper

Acrylic and coloured chalk on paper

Water colour and acrylic on paper

Picasso’s concrete and metal sculptures made in collaboration with Carl Nesjar and Lionel Prejger, kick-started the beginning of my project. Looking at the simplistic cut out shapes of Picasso’s paper models, which his collaborators then transformed, showed me the potential in paper as a medium for my work and how I could develop from it. Having previously researched and engaged largely in set design and architecture, these sculptures showed me a way I could translate these interests.

Water colour and acrylic on paper

Charcoal and chalk on paper

My original plan from the paper sculptures I made was to move into more solid materials, but being in lockdown I could not carry this it out at home. This pushed my work into painting and photography, finding that my paper sculptures could not stand on their own as finished pieces of work.

Looking at artists such as Bob Thompson and the Futurism movement, experimenting with colour has become an important feature. Developing this has been the most successful outcome in my work.

Sculpture is still a key part to this project; even with the work I’m largely producing being two-dimensional; it is a very important influence. Looking at the prints and drawings Naum Gabo made of his sculptures, I have strived to keep that same sculptural quality in my paintings. I see my art developing further with film and a more minimalist abstract style with my most recent interest being in the early works of Agnes Martin and her more subdued palette, along with the Taos Modernists.

Charcoal and chalk on paper

Acrylic on paper

In the next stage of my education looking into different materials and making sculpture will be important. But this time has allowed me to investigate the incorporation of both painting and sculpture together. This has been valuable and introduced me to range of art movements and artists that have greatly impacted my view on both art forms.

Acrylic on paper

Charcoal and colour pencil on paper

Acrylic and coloured chalk on paper

Categories
Drawing Painting
X

Catharina Benigni

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design 2019 / 20

'Untitled' Acrylic paint with some fluid additive, Wool and cotton string, White marker and image transfer printing paper on cartridge paper.

My interests linked to digital art started by looking at the access to visual information that is constantly surrounding us and, unbeknown to us, is affecting how we see the world.

'Untitled' Acrylic paint, Acrylic thinner and white marker on cartridge paper

'Untitled' Image printed on cooking string

I wondered what would happen if I present to the viewer a juxtaposition of this new form of art, but done in very traditional methods like weaving and painting. In order to find out how to do this best, I looked at a variety of artists like James Hugonin, Margo Wolowiec and Anni Albers. As I progressed with my work, I noticed how human mistake contrasts to the accuracy of a digital piece of work, making a clear distinction between the two.

'Untitled' Embroidery thread, image transferred onto cotton string, Acrylic paint on cartridge paper

My experimentation of materials has increase as I adapt to working from home, as I started to work with unconventional things like cooking thread. Even though it was only used in an experiment, it lead to new ideas about embroidery and incorporating these things within a piece of work. I am still learning how these materials work together and how I can use new ideas to develop my work.

I have had to adapt to working from home by making the scale of my work much smaller to make up for the lack of space. Even though there is less freedom, it allows for more detail, which worked better with the work that I am currently working on anyways.

Digital Image. Distortion of image one by changing the code of the file on TextEdit

Originally I was planning on using a 3D QR code on the final show so that the audience would have to scan it to gain access to my piece on their device. This was due to my exploration onto the digital world, and questioning its value of the intangible piece of work that could only be seen on a screen.

'Untitled' Acrylic paint and collage of a digital Image changed on TextEdit

 

'Untitled' Acrylic paint with some fluid additive, Wool and cotton string, White marker and image transfer printing paper on cartridge paper.

My interests linked to digital art started by looking at the access to visual information that is constantly surrounding us and, unbeknown to us, is affecting how we see the world.

'Untitled' Acrylic paint, Acrylic thinner and white marker on cartridge paper

'Untitled' Image printed on cooking string

I wondered what would happen if I present to the viewer a juxtaposition of this new form of art, but done in very traditional methods like weaving and painting. In order to find out how to do this best, I looked at a variety of artists like James Hugonin, Margo Wolowiec and Anni Albers. As I progressed with my work, I noticed how human mistake contrasts to the accuracy of a digital piece of work, making a clear distinction between the two.

'Untitled' Embroidery thread, image transferred onto cotton string, Acrylic paint on cartridge paper

My experimentation of materials has increase as I adapt to working from home, as I started to work with unconventional things like cooking thread. Even though it was only used in an experiment, it lead to new ideas about embroidery and incorporating these things within a piece of work. I am still learning how these materials work together and how I can use new ideas to develop my work.

I have had to adapt to working from home by making the scale of my work much smaller to make up for the lack of space. Even though there is less freedom, it allows for more detail, which worked better with the work that I am currently working on anyways.

Digital Image. Distortion of image one by changing the code of the file on TextEdit

Originally I was planning on using a 3D QR code on the final show so that the audience would have to scan it to gain access to my piece on their device. This was due to my exploration onto the digital world, and questioning its value of the intangible piece of work that could only be seen on a screen.

'Untitled' Acrylic paint and collage of a digital Image changed on TextEdit

 

X

Basma Bin Laden

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design 2019 / 20

Symbolic Shadows (A Glass Installation)

My practice explores mixed-media processes to capture and embody a personal connection with nature meets culture. The organic materials that I feature and manipulate become abstract objects, design sequences or immersive spaces that use light and form as part of an evolving existence.

'Efflorescence' Wallpaper Installation Film

‘Efflorescence’ Digital Wallpaper

Throughout the development of this project maintaining a contrast between contemporary and historical references including William Morris, Gary Hume and Droog Design has been vital to create a balanced yet unusual ‘wallpaper’. I also admired their influence on social and creative change, challenging concepts of ‘the everyday’ and how we interact with the art that surrounds us. Thinking about and responding to the current situation with social isolation, has made me question and consider how the relationship between the inside and outside has become more relevant than ever before within my lifetime.

During the course, having a curious approach and looking deeper into subjects has been on-going for me. I’ve explored a number of interesting and challenging processes that I’ve enjoyed experimenting with such as printmaking, glass and now digital editing that have made my work evolve. When faced with the restriction of materials in current circumstances, I’ve used these obstacles as opportunities and not limitations, remaining dedicated to my original aim that was to create an interior outcome of both beauty and feeling.

 

Making the transition between a mostly hand-made practice to screen-based making has led me to question how I can reinterpret my relationship with the familiar through the unknown. Photoshop and Illustrator became tools of discovery for me, combining drawing with digital editing whilst capturing this process as a film was a layered journey. The virtual wallpaper ‘Efflorescence’ captures the outside world within an inside space throughout the day. As an interior installation, this piece challenges the format of traditional mounted wallpapers to instead become transitional and ever changing. The intention of this is to recreate interior spaces as atmospheric environments without fixed boundary-much like the authentic nature it is based upon, inspired by the changes of theseasons, the solar clock and lifecycles.

Symbolic Shadows (A Glass Installation)

My practice explores mixed-media processes to capture and embody a personal connection with nature meets culture. The organic materials that I feature and manipulate become abstract objects, design sequences or immersive spaces that use light and form as part of an evolving existence.

'Efflorescence' Wallpaper Installation Film

‘Efflorescence’ Digital Wallpaper

Throughout the development of this project maintaining a contrast between contemporary and historical references including William Morris, Gary Hume and Droog Design has been vital to create a balanced yet unusual ‘wallpaper’. I also admired their influence on social and creative change, challenging concepts of ‘the everyday’ and how we interact with the art that surrounds us. Thinking about and responding to the current situation with social isolation, has made me question and consider how the relationship between the inside and outside has become more relevant than ever before within my lifetime.

During the course, having a curious approach and looking deeper into subjects has been on-going for me. I’ve explored a number of interesting and challenging processes that I’ve enjoyed experimenting with such as printmaking, glass and now digital editing that have made my work evolve. When faced with the restriction of materials in current circumstances, I’ve used these obstacles as opportunities and not limitations, remaining dedicated to my original aim that was to create an interior outcome of both beauty and feeling.

 

Making the transition between a mostly hand-made practice to screen-based making has led me to question how I can reinterpret my relationship with the familiar through the unknown. Photoshop and Illustrator became tools of discovery for me, combining drawing with digital editing whilst capturing this process as a film was a layered journey. The virtual wallpaper ‘Efflorescence’ captures the outside world within an inside space throughout the day. As an interior installation, this piece challenges the format of traditional mounted wallpapers to instead become transitional and ever changing. The intention of this is to recreate interior spaces as atmospheric environments without fixed boundary-much like the authentic nature it is based upon, inspired by the changes of theseasons, the solar clock and lifecycles.

Categories
2D Design Film