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Gus Monday

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design 2019 / 20

'A loss of individuality in idealised spaces' Wood, hardboard, cement oxide, acrylic window putty, scrim cloth, pigmented charcoal and polyurethane varnish.

'A Structural Apparition' Pigmented charcoal, conte, chalk pastel, acrylic paint, polyurethane varnish.

The “Death of God” project has drawn from several sources, not necessarily synonymous in style, agency, form or subject. Simply put, the eclectic nature of the subject matter in terms of influence has circumvented rational or even ethereal dissemination of coherent thought, as to the elucidation of a pure or explainable thought, since all ideas are a culmination of natural circumstance; it was just a series of ideas put into images. This was due to the loss of studio facilities, so instead of changing ideas, I changed my practice of working, in an enamoured effort to combat the new vestige of my University. Out with the old; in with the new.

Having made use of the printmaking, metalwork and photography studio during the year, it was indeed my plan to make use of the facilities during my final project, however given the axiomatic circumstance of present problems (not to mention those of South Africa’s where I currently reside), my job was perfectly straight forward. Make art without facilities and with extremely limited resources. Making use of practices skills, such as previous knowledge with chalk pastels, pigmented charcoal, abstraction of form, life drawing, geometric exploration and orthographic projection systems, gave rise to a series of works intrinsically dissimilar to each other in medium yet unified in style.

'Christ’s Fall from Heaven' Duomo Siena plate, overlaid with second plate of writing from Nietzsche’s “The Death of God” The Madman Passage and the Siddhartha. Hard/ Soft ground print with sugarlift-aquitant on Zinc.

'Cow' Gesso, chalk pastel, conte, pigmented charcoal on canvas.

I found myself during this time of struggle, without necessities, not only within art. But that which comes with hardship, always comes with experience and subsequently I am better for it. Struggle ideation and divergence, and I’ve found this time most freeing in terms of what I thought my style was, and what I can be. As a young artist this time has most certainly been and adventure, I now find myself with more ways in which to work and am grateful.

'Fleeting Space' Pigmented charcoal, chalk, chalk pastel and conte on Fabriano accademia cold pressed.

'Portrait' Mezzotint on steel, carbon black ink on Fabriano creme paper.

Triptych No1.,2.,3. 'The Death of God Series' Chalk, chalk pastel, conte.

'The Eternally Vain Quest' Mezzotint on steel, carbon black ink, with watercolour tinting on Fabriano white paper.

'A loss of individuality in idealised spaces' Wood, hardboard, cement oxide, acrylic window putty, scrim cloth, pigmented charcoal and polyurethane varnish.

'A Structural Apparition' Pigmented charcoal, conte, chalk pastel, acrylic paint, polyurethane varnish.

The “Death of God” project has drawn from several sources, not necessarily synonymous in style, agency, form or subject. Simply put, the eclectic nature of the subject matter in terms of influence has circumvented rational or even ethereal dissemination of coherent thought, as to the elucidation of a pure or explainable thought, since all ideas are a culmination of natural circumstance; it was just a series of ideas put into images. This was due to the loss of studio facilities, so instead of changing ideas, I changed my practice of working, in an enamoured effort to combat the new vestige of my University. Out with the old; in with the new.

Having made use of the printmaking, metalwork and photography studio during the year, it was indeed my plan to make use of the facilities during my final project, however given the axiomatic circumstance of present problems (not to mention those of South Africa’s where I currently reside), my job was perfectly straight forward. Make art without facilities and with extremely limited resources. Making use of practices skills, such as previous knowledge with chalk pastels, pigmented charcoal, abstraction of form, life drawing, geometric exploration and orthographic projection systems, gave rise to a series of works intrinsically dissimilar to each other in medium yet unified in style.

'Christ’s Fall from Heaven' Duomo Siena plate, overlaid with second plate of writing from Nietzsche’s “The Death of God” The Madman Passage and the Siddhartha. Hard/ Soft ground print with sugarlift-aquitant on Zinc.

'Cow' Gesso, chalk pastel, conte, pigmented charcoal on canvas.

I found myself during this time of struggle, without necessities, not only within art. But that which comes with hardship, always comes with experience and subsequently I am better for it. Struggle ideation and divergence, and I’ve found this time most freeing in terms of what I thought my style was, and what I can be. As a young artist this time has most certainly been and adventure, I now find myself with more ways in which to work and am grateful.

'Fleeting Space' Pigmented charcoal, chalk, chalk pastel and conte on Fabriano accademia cold pressed.

'Portrait' Mezzotint on steel, carbon black ink on Fabriano creme paper.

Triptych No1.,2.,3. 'The Death of God Series' Chalk, chalk pastel, conte.

'The Eternally Vain Quest' Mezzotint on steel, carbon black ink, with watercolour tinting on Fabriano white paper.